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Jon Smith Modellbau - German LMG Gnr Western Front 1917

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Price:
$60.00
SKU:
JSM - JS11MGS
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Product Description

Jon Smith Modellbau

120mm. Resin Cast.

German Light Machine Gunner, Musketen Battalion, Western Front, April 1917 A member of a four man LMG section belonging to a Musketen battalion - in this case the IV/117th Infantry Regt., from Hessen. They are just returning from the support line were they had, along with the rest of the platoon been called out during the night. A reported breach of the front line had in fact been a large- scale trench raid made by a Scottish unit for intelligence gathering purpose. Formed in the summer of 1915, the Musketen battalions, 3 in all, with a strength of 500 man each, were first equipped with the Danish Madsen LMG (captured from the Russians). These units were kept behind the front lines and used to cover any breakthrough of the defences - a role, which they were well suited for. Contents: Figure (8 parts) 2nd Head 2 x Spectacles (Plexi) Water Bottle - Feldflasche M1907 Haversack - Brotbeutel M1887 Gas Mask M.17 - Gasmaske M.17 Metallbehälter Bayonet - Seitengewehr 84/98 Lewis Gun .303-inch Bipod 2 x Magazines Pistol 08 Stick Grenade - Stielhandgranate M.15 Steel Helmet - Stahlhelm M.16 Figure Base A member of a four man LMG section belonging to a Musketen battalion - in this case the IV/117th Infantry Regt., from Hessen. They are just returning from the support line were they had, along with the rest of the platoon been called out during the night. A reported breach of the front line had in fact been a large- scale trench raid made by a Scottish unit for intelligence gathering purpose. Formed in the summer of 1915, the Musketen battalions, 3 in all, with a strength of 500 man each, were first equipped with the Danish Madsen LMG (captured from the Russians). These units were kept behind the front lines and used to cover any breakthrough of the defences - a role, which they were well suited for. Uniform Field Cap: Feldmütze M1910. Made out of a field grey material. The band and piping were in red of the infantry. The two metal Kokarden badges at the front were - top: Die Reichsfarben: black, white and red (from outwards to the centre) and - bottom: represents the state were the unit was raised - e.g. Prussia - Preussen: black, white and black. Bavaria - Bayern: white, light blue and white. Brunswick - Braunschweig: blue, yellow and blue. Hessen - Hessen: white, red and white etc. Some units covered the red band with a strip of darker material. From 1917 a new field cap was introduced with a dark green band for all arms, but both types were worn along side each other for the remainder of the war. The field cap was worn extensively throughout the war, both in the rear and front line areas. The troops would wear them in all different shapes and styles. In fact it was commented by the Officer Commanding the Sniper School in the British First Army area, how well the German field cap, with its floppy and uneven edges, blended in with its surroundings. (The British caps were far larger and flatter on top, reflecting the light and hence attracting attention). Field Service Dress: Feldbluse M1915. Was to replace the early M1907/10 and the simplified M1914 service dress tunics. All three were in fact worn along side each other throughout the war. Colour: made out of a dark grey material (Jäger and Schützen units wore sometimes a green- grey version), with generally a baggy appearance. The turn down collar was green and the infantry had the shoulder straps outlined in white, with the regimental number, or monogram in red. Some units removed the shoulder straps altogether, particularly towards the end of the war. The six buttons were hidden behind a flap and quite often stormtroopers had leather patches on the elbows. Note: with a bit of care and a thin, sharp blade it is possible to hollow out the gap underneath the right shoulder strap and tunic. This can also be applied behind the bayonet frog and the right hand haversack strap - the one under the right arm. Service Dress Trousers: Uniformhose M1914. Were identical to the M1907/10, but made out of a stone- grey material. Quite often produced without the red stripe - Litzen - running down each side of the trouser leg. Colour: stone- grey. Puttees: Wickelgamaschen. Made out of any material available. Designed to cover the cap between boot and trousers, also keeping the lower leg warm and dry. Boots: Knöchelhohe Stiefel M1901. Nailed ankle boots with 31 nails in 5 rows on the sole. Colour: brown. Equipment Steel Helmet: Stahlhelm M.16. This helmet, which first entered service in 1916 was designed by Professor Friedrich Schwerd and made from high quality chrome-nickel steel. Weighing between 950 and 1200g, depending on size - more heavier than the Allied helmets, but giving a better protection to the face, ears and neck. The horn venting bolts on each side enabled the fitting of an extra armoured shield over the helmet (also available in 1:15th, 120mm from JSM, winter 2008) for sentries, snipers or other more dangerous employment. This weighing around 2000g was seldom used; although a total of 50 000 were produced. Colour: the helmet was issued in field- grey, but was sometimes repainted at the front with a four- colour camouflage scheme - red- brown, ochre (brownish- yellow), green and blue- grey. Some helmets had these patterns also outlined in black. Helmets were also covered using the light brown sandbag material, or the issued helmet-covers, seen particularly in the later war period. The M.17 & 18 helmets followed with only slight differences to the inside and chin strap fasteners. The last model to see service during the war, if only in small numbers was the M.18 Ohrenausschnitt, or Helmet with ear cut-outs (also available in 1:15th, 120mm from JSM, winter 2008), more commonly (and stubbornly) known as the Cavalry or Telegraph Helmet. In fact the cut-outs were a further design feature of the M.18 to improve the hearing ability of the wearer. Note: The rim and underneath edge of the helmet can be thinned out, giving a more realistic appearance of the original item - for casting reasons this has to be thicker. The brown card supplied can be used to represent leather or material chin straps etc. Cut the card approx. 1.2mm wide and 22 mm long and flatten or rub down on a hard surface with a blunt tool (handle of a modelling knife is ideal). Bend the strip around a pencil to give a natural curve and glue into position on the figure. The colour, thickness and texture achieved from rubbing down the card gives a good reproduction of leather in this scale. Belt: Koppel M1895. From 1915 onwards, belts were issued blackened. The buckle was painted grey. Haversack: Brotbeutel M1887. Also known as the bread bag. Made out of a canvas material and generally used for rations etc. It was a popular place to keep the spare gas mask filter. Colour: grey- brown. Water Bottle: Feldflasche M1907. This had a capacity of 1¾ pint and was attached to the haversack by means of a leather strap and buckle. Originally made from aluminium, later Ersatz material and covered with a brown felt material. On one side are the four metal snap fasteners, which were normally painted over in grey. It was quite common for front line troops, particularly during combat periods to carry a second water bottle. Gas Mask: Gasmaske M1917. The gas mask was kept in a metal container, which had a brown cloth strap. Troops serving in the front area often wore it in the alert position at the front of the chest. There was no room for the reserve filter in the container. Through constant use the containers became dented. Colour: grey. Note: when fixing the other half of the cloth strap (using the brown card supplied) there is a small cavity behind and under the tunic collar for it to slip into. The other end is then attached to one of the top fastening loops on the container (the bottom loop was used to fasten the container to one of the tunic M1907/10 buttons by a small strap when being worn in the alert position). Spectacles: It was not uncommon for front line troops, even in the infantry to have spectacles and is seen on many photos of this period. There are 2 (1 spare) computer cut spectacles in 0.25 mm Plexi glass and a strip of thin copper wire to represent the bows (side pieces). It would advisable putting off the assembly of the spectacles until last, also leaving the head off the figure. Paint the wire and the outside of the glass separately. If you paint just the outside edge of the spectacles, this should shine through the glass giving a good impression of a metal rim. Glue the spectacles over the nose first (a small dab of wood-glue is ideal), and then fix the bows each side. Colour: flat- brass. Weapons Bayonet: Seitengewehr 84/98. The handle had a wooden grip and the sheath was black. The bayonet frog would have been blackened leather. Pistol 08: As a machine gunner he had a secondary weapon for self defence. The 08 - or Luger (the Germans never called this weapon the Luger - this is an anglicised name) was first produced in 1900, with the German military taken it on in 1908 - hence P 08. As a service pistol it had its drawbacks, mainly it was expensive, difficult to produce and susceptible to dirt. Colour of holster: blackened leather. Lewis Gun: Originally designed by Samuel MacLean and then redesigned by Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis of the United States Coast Artillery. In 1913, after having the gun rejected by the US Army, Colonel Lewis set up production in a factory in Liege, Belgium. Before the Germans overran Belgium in 1914 the production was transferred to the Birmingham Small Arms Company in England. As both sides settled down to mainly four year of static trench warfare a need for a light machine gun in the British Army became apparent. When introduced it was a welcomed addition to the infantryman's firepower, even with its complex design and many different type of stoppages. The rotating magazine held 47 .303-inch rounds in two layers. When being carried on the shoulder the magazine was normally removed to allow the gun to sit more comfortably, closer to the neck. The Germans used captured Lewis guns extensively, equipping infantry, stormtrooper MG units and parts of their Musketen battalions - replacing the Danish Madsens. The guns were re-chambered to take the German 7.92 mm round and unofficially called Tellergewehr - plate rifle. Many units retained their Lewis guns, even after the introduction of Germany's first light machine gun - Maschinengewehr 08/15, which was somewhat cumbersome and heavy (17.7 Kg. to 12.25 Kg.). Note: here it is also possible to hollow out the space between the rear sight and mount, as well as inside the forward sling attachment (under the barrel). The bipod legs should be fixed with the `spade´ like slats facing outwards away from the barrel and with the small wing nuts underneath. The magazine should rotate when placed on the gun. Colour: the wooden stock and pistol grips were of a dark wood. All other parts were a dark gun- metal. Stick Grenade: Stielhandgranate M.15. The second type of German stick grenade to be issued (in greater numbers from 1916 onwards). The turned wooden handle would have the fuse duration stamped on one side, along with the makers name and production date. This grenade had the advantage of a screw cap, covering the porcelain ball and pulls cord igniter-system, keeping it dry and free from dirt. Most stick grenades were set with a 5.5 or 7-second time delay. The cap crown has 8 knurled indents to enable a better grip in wet/muddy conditions, or when wearing cloves. The metal clip on the side of the explosive charge is for attaching to equipment etc. On some original photos it can be seen that the screw caps have already been removed, ready for instant use if needed. The original master model was made using a fine grain wood to reproduce the surface of the handle. Colour: Metal parts - green/grey. Wooden stick/handle - untreated wood starts turning grey after a length of time when exposed to the elements. Note: with a bit of care and a thin, sharp blade it is possible to hollow out the gap behind the clip and the explosive charge, not forgetting to leave the bottom part of the clip still attached. The Base: The base supplied with the figure depicts a muddy ground with bicycle/wheel tracks. His left boot has just made an in- print in the soft mud.


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